Jump to content


Check out our Community Blogs

Register and join over 40,000 other developers!


Recent Status Updates

View All Updates

Photo
- - - - -

How to you stay productive when you don't feel like it

productivity learning

  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 SaaKalaba

SaaKalaba

    CC Lurker

  • New Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 04 March 2015 - 08:57 AM

I understand that in order to be good at something, you need to enjoy the process of doing it. Otherwise you'll never willingly put enough time and effort every day in order to do it. 

I like coding, but I seem to have trouble with the process of learning new programming languages. I didn't have that problem before back in college. If I'm a part of a learning group, the motivation comes from the competition part; I wan't to the the best one in the class. The reward is the feeling of superiority and being the best. It may be a bad way of thinking, but it motivates me and creates results so I don't mind. 
The other big motivator is being a part of a team. If someone is depending on me to learn something and create something with that knowledge, the fear of letting someone down will keep me from procrastinating and allow me to get stuff done. 

The problem is now that I finished school I have to learn a bunch of different languages on my own, from home. I can't be a part of a learning group, and since I'm doing this only for me, I constantly procrastinate and things move very slowly, and sometimes nothing gets done at all. It is extremely important that I develop the proper thought process in my head that will enable me to learn by myself because a good programmer needs to constantly learn and learn and learn. 

I know that I can learn efficiently, and I know what motivates me. Is there any way to "trick" my brain into being productive like it naturally is in the situations described above without the said motivators being present? What do you guys do when you really don't feel like doing something, but just have to do it anyway?

 

Any advice is appreciated.

 


  • 0

#2 WingedPanther73

WingedPanther73

    A spammer's worst nightmare

  • Moderator
  • 17757 posts
  • Location:Upstate, South Carolina
  • Programming Language:C, C++, PL/SQL, Delphi/Object Pascal, Pascal, Transact-SQL, Others
  • Learning:Java, C#, PHP, JavaScript, Lisp, Fortran, Haskell, Others

Posted 04 March 2015 - 09:33 AM

A good question might be, "What are you doing with the new language to demonstrate competence/mastery?"

 

My guess is you're learning a variety of languages in order to be attractive in the job market. In that case, your goal is not to learn a bunch of languages so you can check them off on a list, but to have a portfolio of applications that you can use to demonstrate your skills. For each language, before you start it, you may want to set a challenge to yourself of building a particular application in that language by the end. Now you aren't trying to "learn a language", you're trying to "build application XYZ in this language".

 

I don't know if that'll work for you, but I actually picked up the basics of C# in about a week and then built a simple todo application that saves its data to XML in about a day.

Something else you may want to do, if what I just said sounds crazy/impossible, is pick up the book Seven Languages in Seven Weeks. It's quite possible that your problem is how you're trying to learn new languages.  When we're in school, we get giant books about a language and steadily work through them over the course of several months. For the first language, it feels like a nightmare of information overload. For the second couple, it feels stressful. The next few are pretty easy. Then you start learning other stuff, like compiler theory, etc.

When you get to your tenth language, trying to read a 1000 page book that explains the concept of inheritance for OOP in excruciating detail for the seventh time is going to be painful. The problem isn't with you, it's you grabbed the wrong book :)


  • 1

Programming is a branch of mathematics.
My CodeCall Blog | My Personal Blog

My MineCraft server site: http://banishedwings.enjin.com/


#3 BlackRabbit

BlackRabbit

    CodeCall Legend

  • Expert Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3871 posts
  • Location:Argentina
  • Programming Language:C, C++, C#, PHP, JavaScript, Transact-SQL, Bash, Others
  • Learning:Java, Others

Posted 04 March 2015 - 04:18 PM

First, you can always make a learning group on your own.

Second, being productive and learning something you don't feel like are not the same matter.

 

But if competition is your drive, well, I assume others are learning just like you do, so keep tabs on how long the others take to learn, use that as an incentive.


  • 0

#4 SaaKalaba

SaaKalaba

    CC Lurker

  • New Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 05 March 2015 - 04:55 AM

First, you can always make a learning group on your own.

 

How do I organize a group like that if no one around me is learning programming? Can I create a group like that online, and how?


  • 0

#5 WingedPanther73

WingedPanther73

    A spammer's worst nightmare

  • Moderator
  • 17757 posts
  • Location:Upstate, South Carolina
  • Programming Language:C, C++, PL/SQL, Delphi/Object Pascal, Pascal, Transact-SQL, Others
  • Learning:Java, C#, PHP, JavaScript, Lisp, Fortran, Haskell, Others

Posted 05 March 2015 - 05:04 AM

People are ALWAYS learning programming. All around you. The issue is that it's not a team sport. It doesn't require large, outdoor fields or special facilities. It's just you, and your computer.


  • 0

Programming is a branch of mathematics.
My CodeCall Blog | My Personal Blog

My MineCraft server site: http://banishedwings.enjin.com/






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: productivity, learning

Recommended from our users: Dynamic Network Monitoring from WhatsUp Gold from IPSwitch. Free Download