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Career Advice

career student programming

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27 replies to this topic

#13 WingedPanther73

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 02:31 PM

The last time I was job hunting, I had 5 years experience, and it took me several months to find a job. That was staying employed.


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#14 ssjdx1

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 02:36 PM

Thanks guys, on a similar note how would you recommend I go about fitting interviews into my schedule ?


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#15 lespauled

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 04:09 PM

If you are looking close to your area, it's really not a problem, because taking a long lunch or leaving a few hours early for the interview won't usually be an issue.  There might be times when you'll have more than one interview in a day.  If so, you might need to take the entire day off.


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#16 birko19

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 04:24 PM

Thanks guys, on a similar note how would you recommend I go about fitting interviews into my schedule ?

 

You will just have to take days off or lie that you have something to do in that time period. That's the only way but be assured that many people do it so you'll be fine. The bottom line is, if you want a career in development you gotta go for it, don't stay in support.


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#17 BlackRabbit

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 07:19 PM

Exactly! the more time you spend as tech support guy the less a programer you look like to future employers, friends, and even yourself.

 

It's time to give priority to your goal, else you will be suck up by the support black hole, and the more into it you are, the less likely for you to ever get out. So just go for development, comfort is what led you to TS, taking risk is what will get you out of there.


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#18 0xDEADBEEF

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 02:30 AM

You will just have to take days off or lie that you have something to do in that time period. That's the only way but be assured that many people do it so you'll be fine. The bottom line is, if you want a career in development you gotta go for it, don't stay in support.

 

yep, if the interview is close do it in lunch breaks etc... Otherwise its half-days/days off. 


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#19 WingedPanther73

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 11:29 AM

Thanks guys, on a similar note how would you recommend I go about fitting interviews into my schedule ?

I burned a few vacation days on short notice. Nowadays (since I ended up staying with my old job thanks to a nice counter-offer), my boss likes to tease me that vacation requests are approved as long as they aren't for job interviews.


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#20 ssjdx1

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 10:24 AM

Thanks for the advice, I've made it through to a 2nd stage interview for a position as a Junior Java developer but now I'm starting to wonder what the benefits of being a developer are over an application support analyst ?

 

Could someone please let me know why being a developer is better than a support analyst? 


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#21 birko19

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 01:39 PM

Thanks for the advice, I've made it through to a 2nd stage interview for a position as a Junior Java developer but now I'm starting to wonder what the benefits of being a developer are over an application support analyst ?

 

Could someone please let me know why being a developer is better than a support analyst? 

 

Benefits? That's up to you to decide. From your first post I thought you wanted to have a career as a developer? If you don't care much for it and you're making decent money, I guess you're better off not bothering. I'm saying this because working as a developer is not an easy thing to do, and unless you love doing it, chances are you're either going to struggle and quit or be a very lousy developer which will eventually not last long term.


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#22 ssjdx1

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 01:47 PM

That is true, the thing is during university I enjoyed programming but I know its much more demanding in the real world. In terms of salary in general, who would get paid more a senior support analyst or senior developer ?

 

As most of you can tell I'm second guessing myself probably because I've become use to being a support analyst. In all honesty, what's driving me toward development is that you don't have to put in as much out of hours work as you would with a support position (this is from assumption as we currently have a weekly rota).


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#23 lespauled

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Posted 18 February 2014 - 06:26 AM

It's a personal choice.  I could never be in support.  You simply assist people on what others have built.  In programming, you actually build.

 

I sometimes lose my mind when family members call me for help and I have to diagnose what they did to screw things up.  I would NEVER do this as a job.  NEVER.

 

I sometimes hear the tech people here on the phone and I tell them that they are better people that I am.  There is no way I could do that.  

 

If you have the patience of a saint, maybe support is for you.  If not, look elsewhere.


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#24 0xDEADBEEF

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Posted 18 February 2014 - 06:51 AM

Indeed they are different jobs (I think that salary wise developers earn more.)  I'd hate support, L2 isn't to bad though.

 

I understand that Salary is an important concern; but as I've said before first figure out which domain you think is the best for you. The plain fact of the matter is if you dislike the work and aren't suited to it, you'll never rise above the average salary; if you love the work you'll rise above the chaff be promoted and earn more and do it quicker.

 

Basically I'd take a step back and say to myself what do I like about technology e.g.

  1. I like creating things from scratch.
  2. I like to see if I can break things.
  3. I like understanding stuff and writing about it.
  4. I enjoy sharing my technical knowledge with others,
  5. I enjoy the buzz of helping someone fix and issue they had.
  6. Data, data, data!

We can help match what you like with a job easily...

 

Oh and:


That is true, the thing is during university I enjoyed programming but I know its much more demanding in the real world.

 

this is (very) sadly not true in many places...


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