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Career Advice

career student programming

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27 replies to this topic

#1 ssjdx1

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 11:22 AM

Hi All,

 

I've recently graduated from university with a 1st class honors in computer science with a years experience as a programmer in industry (part of my course).

 

Since graduating I've been working an application support analyst role but I'm starting to realise that I should have gone into development instead of support.

 

Would you recommend that I keep my job and apply for development roles whilst there or leave and dedicate all my time to applying for a development role ?

 

The reason I say leave is because I understand you have to break into development early as the transition from support to development isn't easy.

 

Please let me know your thoughts as any guidance would help.

 

Thanks.


Edited by Roger, 13 January 2014 - 04:23 PM.
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#2 0xDEADBEEF

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 12:29 PM

If you don't like support get out, as quickly as possible. But you don't need to quit until you have a job; you should have time to find a role whilst you're still working surely?


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#3 Sundance

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 12:48 PM

I agree with Evan plus it looks better to an employer if you're currently working rather than it does if you impulsively quit to try and get a new job.


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#4 ssjdx1

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 03:33 AM

Thanks I'm defiantly going to stay until I find a new job, but my one worry is that a year goes by and I'm still in support. If that is the case should I leave ?
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#5 0xDEADBEEF

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 04:45 AM

Problem is, if you quit it looks bad on you. Basically it makes you look like a quitter. A company that would employ you will think that if they give you some work which you dis-like, you might just quit or just not do the work. Where as if you've held done a job you dis-like whilst still building up your own skills on your own time to get the job you actually want.

 

Then you look much better to other employers.


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#6 WingedPanther73

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 05:50 AM

Think about it this way: let's say it will take a year to find a job (statistics say nine months last I checked). If you quit now, how do you pay your bills? Also, as soon as you quit, you are sending two signals to potential employers: You're unemployed (bad), and you make poor decisions (very bad).

Your first priority needs to be paying your bills. Working support does that. Also, working support gives you practical experience you can leverage: you understand the kinds of things users ACTUALLY do. You've learned how to look at code, compare it with user inputs, etc. Those are valuable skills that are worth developing, even if the job is boring.


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#7 lespauled

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 06:40 AM

When I was consulting (for many, many years), I found that you are way more hire-able when you have a current position.  I have always received 10-20 times the calls for positions when I already had a contract.

 

Stay where you are, and keep looking.  It will help you on two fronts:

 

  • As stated above, it makes you more attractive to hiring managers when you have a job.
  • It also helps NOT to have gaps in your resume.  

 

When you have gaps, especially longer than a month, it looks like you had interviews and didn't get the job (even if you didn't have any interviews), which makes hiring managers suspicious.


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#8 birko19

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 11:50 AM

If you want a career in development then get out from support as soon as possible. Don't let time pass by you in this industry because it moves pretty quickly and if you don't move with it, you will have a hard time later.

 

In the meantime keep yourself in good shape by practicing and look for a job while still working. No sense in quitting if you don't another offer.

 

 

Think about it this way: let's say it will take a year to find a job (statistics say nine months last I checked). If you quit now, how do you pay your bills? Also, as soon as you quit, you are sending two signals to potential employers: You're unemployed (bad), and you make poor decisions (very bad).

Your first priority needs to be paying your bills. Working support does that. Also, working support gives you practical experience you can leverage: you understand the kinds of things users ACTUALLY do. You've learned how to look at code, compare it with user inputs, etc. Those are valuable skills that are worth developing, even if the job is boring.

 

I completely agree but does it REALLY take 9 months to get a job? If you live in a decent size city it should not take that long in this field.


Edited by birko19, 14 January 2014 - 11:52 AM.

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#9 lespauled

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 11:56 AM

If you have a lot of experience, probably not.  But if you're just starting out, it's very likely.


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#10 birko19

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 01:06 PM

If you have a lot of experience, probably not.  But if you're just starting out, it's very likely.

 

Experience does play a huge role of course. I just think if you live in a decent size city 9 months would be too long to get a job. Even if you're looking for entry level.


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#11 lespauled

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 01:16 PM

I don't think there are many cities bigger than mine.  The market is flooded.  A beginner will have a hard time breaking into this business.


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#12 birko19

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 01:55 PM

I don't think there are many cities bigger than mine.  The market is flooded.  A beginner will have a hard time breaking into this business.

 

I'm from Canada so perhaps things a different in other countries.


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