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PHP Advice,Coding, Project Manager, Tools, Etc

php management team programming

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#13 Pally

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 03:17 PM

I'm still curious if I should use a framework like 'yii', or 'cake php', I see it being debated online, I've never used one but so people say it helps do things better faster etc.. others say it restricts you, anyone have advice for my situation?


Edited by Pally, 27 April 2013 - 03:18 PM.

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#14 WingedPanther73

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 07:00 AM

The books I referenced will help out with good programming practices.

 

I am VERY conflicted on frameworks. On one hand, they can let you whip together code very quickly, resulting in highly compressed development times. On the other hand, I was recently testing RAD-PHP, and the entire script broke when I placed the files in a folder called "test-PHP" because of a bug in their code that was looking for the file extension "php" and didn't do it intelligently. I have no idea how they ever missed it in development. I wasted a few hours crawling up a class hierarchy to find the bug in the framework's code and work around it.

 

The other problem comes when you start optimizing performance. If the performance problems are in your framework, how on earth will you optimize it? For example, do you really want to instantiate a 20 deep class hierarchy to drop a button on your page and hook it to an AJAX call? Some frameworks are better than others, of course, and I suspect my experience is with a poorer one. Despite that, I personally view them with mistrust.

So, if you have to get a functioning page QUICKLY, frameworks can be great. If you need to create a page where you can optimize where ever you need to, and customize whatever you need to, frameworks can bite you. 


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#15 Pally

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 01:37 PM

Any advice on how to split up the coding? By tasks or break up the components of the tasks? Probably a dumb question.. my guess is define how two points will talk and then the two components should hopefully work lol :-P
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#16 WingedPanther73

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 06:09 AM

This is where TDD/XP/etc techniques come into play. By defining classes with specifically defined interfaces, it makes things a lot easier to hand out the implementations. You can do the same with utility functions. You could even write the test harnesses for various classes/functions/interfaces, and then provide those to your team members to satisfy :)


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#17 Pally

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 12:48 PM

This is where TDD/XP/etc techniques come into play. By defining classes with specifically defined interfaces, it makes things a lot easier to hand out the implementations. You can do the same with utility functions. You could even write the test harnesses for various classes/functions/interfaces, and then provide those to your team members to satisfy :)

Great I appreciate all your advice as always, I'm also looking to implement the model-view-controller architecture.

 

So I defiantly have a ton to learn but with your help I know what to do first and  where to go from here thanks so much!


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#18 WingedPanther73

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 01:14 PM

I know tons of theory :) I don't always implement all of it. For example, I rarely have to work with other developers on my projects, many of my projects are barely large enough to justify TDD, etc, etc, etc. I freaking LOVE wikis, though.


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#19 Pally

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 06:51 AM

I know tons of theory :) I don't always implement all of it. For example, I rarely have to work with other developers on my projects, many of my projects are barely large enough to justify TDD, etc, etc, etc. I freaking LOVE wikis, though.

Yeah I'm gonna setup the wiki on my home computer today or tomorrow and play with it looks awesome,

 

I was thinking about having two separate sections one for coders to catch up or read about how things were done in the past and good for my own future reference to remember things.

 

Then another section for the customers/employees to read up on how to use the software from their viewpoint.

 

are you using it in a similar fashion?


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#20 WingedPanther73

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 08:58 AM

I use tiddlywikis as an organizational tool. I have one that I keep a list of all my current projects in, their current status, links to their cases in our webmail/support system, and links to individual project wiki files.

 

For large projects, where a simple word document with a statement of work is insufficient, I create a project wiki. These usually include todo sections, lists of feedback with corrected items crossed out, specifications for complicated interactions, etc. These usually also have a link to the support case, as well. These come in REALLY handy when you suddenly get a promotion and need to hand a project off to somebody else, or when you have several month gaps between working on a given project.

 

I've seen a lot of FLOSS projects use wikis for both user documentation and developer documentation. Some even have integration for forums associated with the wiki. Ultimately, you have to decide what will work best for you. For example, a User wiki has to be visible outside your corporate firewall, but a developer wiki can be on most any purely internal server.


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#21 Pally

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 10:33 AM

I use tiddlywikis as an organizational tool. I have one that I keep a list of all my current projects in, their current status, links to their cases in our webmail/support system, and links to individual project wiki files.

 

For large projects, where a simple word document with a statement of work is insufficient, I create a project wiki. These usually include todo sections, lists of feedback with corrected items crossed out, specifications for complicated interactions, etc. These usually also have a link to the support case, as well. These come in REALLY handy when you suddenly get a promotion and need to hand a project off to somebody else, or when you have several month gaps between working on a given project.

 

I've seen a lot of FLOSS projects use wikis for both user documentation and developer documentation. Some even have integration for forums associated with the wiki. Ultimately, you have to decide what will work best for you. For example, a User wiki has to be visible outside your corporate firewall, but a developer wiki can be on most any purely internal server.

 

took me about 10 minutes to learn 80% of it, awesome :D


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#22 Pally

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 08:07 AM

I use tiddlywikis as an organizational tool. 

 

How should I structure my links, for example If I have the page "product z" and then I want to link that page to all development I am finding I have to name that page "product z development", it would be nice if I could just call "development"?

 

the problem I foresee is when I get several topics going and I'm having the name them "product x development" and then "product y development user interface"

 

or maybe I'm organizing poorly just thought I'd ask since every tiddly on tiddlywiki seems to need a unique name


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#23 WingedPanther73

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 06:00 AM

Tiddlywiki has tags that are searchable as well. I would name it "product z" with a "development" tag.


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#24 Pally

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 10:46 AM

Tiddlywiki has tags that are searchable as well. I would name it "product z" with a "development" tag.

yeah I noticed the search field but I wanted to have the page called "product z" and have a table of contents to all the other pages like links to "product z backlog", "product z user guide", "product z etc"

 

hope that makes sense, I may misunderstand what you meant but with your idea I would always have to search for it, it would be nice to also have everything as table of contents so I can share the pages with people and it's intuitive to my co-workers.. (I'll share an image of my wiki so they can't destroy it) :D


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