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Editor Like Vim Or Ide

VIM IDE editor

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8 replies to this topic

#1 gabbi

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 01:29 AM

Hi guys!

Up to now, I have been still writing my code (in general) always in IDEs. That means, for web development I've used Aptana Studio and as for C/C++, I've used only gedit, because actually I haven't done so much in this language(s). But now, the situation changes a little bit, because I'm trying to recover my C++ knowledge, so I'm going to do much more effort in this language, write much more code. So I'm just wondering, whether it's better to use some IDE for C++ (like Eclipse), or to learn working with editor like VIM. I'd like to know personal experience of advanced programmers, if VIM is also used in larger projects consisting of many separated files and so. In general, whether it's worth it to make so much effort to learn working with VIM and typing code in this program, or it's better to stay working in IDE.

I know, that it's very individual for everybody, but I just want to know what the personal experiences are. Thanks for replies.
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#2 WingedPanther73

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 01:33 PM

It depends on what you're doing. I usually use a mixture of the two. For example, I frequently code in Delphi, which is normally done using the Delphi IDE. However, I often find that jEdit or geany give me better code-folding and regex search/replace options, so will use them for a lot of coding, too. What I often do is open the file in both the IDE and another editor, flipping back and forth between the two.

What I recommend is experimenting with what gives you the most productivity.
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#3 gabbi

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 10:03 PM

Thanks for sharing your experience. I'd like to read more personal experiences, so I'm waiting for your replies.
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#4 shill

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 07:22 PM

For large projects, I usually use an IDE (Code::Blocks), but I'll open certain files in VIM if I know that VIM has a feature that will help me do something quickly, like regex-based search and replace or navigating quickly with the keyboard. For small projects in scripting languages, I just use VIM.
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#5 BlackRabbit

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 09:26 PM

i go with Shill advise, you should download code::blocks right now :D
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#6 gabbi

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 11:39 PM

Thanks everyone for replies. After some time, I decided to use mainly IDE - NetBeans, because I mainly work on projects which consist of many files. Maybe it would be great to use VIM for small projects consisting of one-two files, but I find it really to learn working in it :confused: I'll try to take it in really small pieces and maybe I'll get used to it after some time.

Feel free and go on sharing your experience, whether you use IDEs or a text editor for programming.
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#7 papabear

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 12:38 AM

hello gabbi learning I only use text editors like notepad when I'm learning something because it's a good way for a programmer to memorize or familiarized his/her self with the syntax, because using IDE's will just spoon feed every programmer because of it's auto suggest and auto fix syntax feature. However if I'm about to work with large projects or real projects I'm going to use an IDE because I find it so fast to develop something with a time limit. :)
Good Luck in using the NetBeans IDE, it's a good IDE with many extensions that you can use to add functionality.
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#8 gregwarner

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 05:35 AM

I often appreciate the auto suggest and auto fix features of a good IDE because, while true that it can be a crutch to the programmer, if used properly, it can speed up some of the mundane points of code writing. A good solid auto complete is therefore important to me. Also, macros and templates can help to flesh out the major control structures without a lot of typing. The goal is to speed up your coding, not let it become a crutch.

Of course, if one is sufficiently knowledgeable, you can get some really good functionality out of macros in text editors such as Emacs.
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#9 shill

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 09:45 AM

Using an IDE versus using VIM is like driving an automatic car vs. standard. If you started learning on an automatic, you'll wonder what the point is of learning standard. But if you talk to anybody who learned on a standard, they'll tell you how much power they have over the car. If you want that power, learn VIM, but if you don't find yourself lacking, then there's no need to learn it.
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