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Practical C Programming


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8 replies to this topic

#1 Chewie

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Posted 05 October 2010 - 07:38 PM

Any reviews on this book by O'Reilly, from a beginners standpoint?
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#2 Alexander

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Posted 05 October 2010 - 09:47 PM

It teaches IDE use and debugging, as well as many untouched features in the moot quality beginner books I had reviewed before, which are useful to a (real) programmer. I would personally purchase it if I had written atleast a somewhat full program before, maybe not absolute beginner.
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#3 Chewie

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 11:45 AM

Any suggestions on how to begin as a total"noob", that doesn't require going to a class( can't afford classes ATM)
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#4 Alexander

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 11:56 AM

This is usually recommended in university (intro courses) for its simplicity but depth
Amazon.com: C Programming Language (2nd Edition) (0076092003106): Brian W. Kernighan, Dennis M. Ritchie: Books

A sample chapter (one of the beginning ones):
http://www.informit..../0131103628.pdf

It's from 1988 but it is in its prime (C is an old language remember, C++ may be easier for you..)
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#5 Chewie

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 12:35 PM

Yeah I have that book (haven't read it yet) but it is a highly recommended book so I'll dabble in that first, and I am aware of the whole c vs c++ thing but cause of my stubborn ways I am going to learn C, C++,C# and i Know c and c++ are complete opposites but correct me if I am wrong but having a little knowledge in C already shall put me a step ahead in C++ ( cause their syntax's I believe it is, are kind of similar??)?
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#6 Alexander

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 08:33 PM

You will most definitely be able to use all your knowledge from C in C++, C++ is an OO language with a somewhat comprehensive standard library with useful classes, so it is naturally a good choice for specific projects over C. I would not learn C# unless you wish to do .NET stuff, It's a microsoft-only language, and was meant to be a competitor for Java, not another "C"-type language
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All new problems require investigation, and so if errors are problems, try to learn as much as you can and report back.


#7 Chewie

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 09:09 PM

Ah, well you've just taught me something new! Why thank you! :)
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“The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity.”


#8 mrlemke

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 09:26 AM

Stanford has some resources on C that I found rather useful as a complete beginner. I find that it is rather easy to "get into" and begin learning. They have stuff on pointers, linked lists, the essentials of C, and binary trees. They also have some stuff on Perl and Unix programming tools.

Stanford CS Ed Library

Also, C and C++ aren't complete opposites. They may use different programming paradigms, but C++ is built upon C. Didn't you ever hear how C++ was originally "C with Classes"?
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#9 Chewie

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 05:30 PM

^ that is what I meant, and thank you for the resources. ;)
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#!CrunchBang Linux ~$ apt-get into it | #!(Statler:R20101205): OpenBox | Like Linux?
“The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity.”





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