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Getting the hang on the "OOP thinkin process"


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#1 Coldhearth

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 06:20 AM

Hi, I've been studying applied informatics for 2 year now and they teach us all sorts of languages ranging from COBOL to Java and C#/.NET.

But one thing keeps bothering me... the thinking process of "Object Oriented Programming" :(
I can create simple applications in Java and in PHP and C# but once I get to the point I have to start a whole application just from a text with the problem case in I get stuck.

I can't seem to get the hang on the "thinking process" behind "Object Oriented Programming" :(

Can anyone help me with this cause I really have to be able to think in this way to become a good programmer!

Books, tutorials, anything... that trains you in "thinking OOP".
(As languages I prefer Java and PHP - Java mostly - for the books or examples)
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#2 WingedPanther73

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 08:29 AM

OOP thinking is really about a perspective as you approach the problem.

In procedural/imperative programming, you are focused on what actions you want to take, and add variables as needed to stored data you are working on.

In OOP, you are focused on what "objects" exist, add data to describe the state of the objects, and add methods to alter/expose the objects' states.

The best realistic example of OOP programming is GUI programming. You have various objects (forms, buttons, dropdowns, labels, etc) with various states (captions, names, items in lists, selected items, etc) that can be affected in various ways (clicking, typing, selecting items, etc).
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#3 Coldhearth

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 01:10 PM

I know it's a completely different thinking process...
My question is how do I teach myself to learn to think in therm of objects and relations between objects, methods and attributes...

Do a books like "The Object Oriented Thought Process 3th edition" or "Head First: Object Oriented Analysis and Design" teach me those skills or are they focusing on other stuff?
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#4 WingedPanther73

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 01:31 PM

I've picked it up mainly by writing programs and forcing myself to do this. Designing classes, such as a chess board, chess pieces, etc. can go a long way towards helping.

I didn't pick it up form a book, just from lots of coding and reading code.
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#5 NatalieM

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Posted 15 December 2009 - 11:52 AM

I have found the book "Object Thinking" by David West very useful.

Edited by NatalieM, 15 December 2009 - 11:52 AM.
Typo

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