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Cracking your own WEP Network to test security

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27 replies to this topic

#13 TkTech

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Posted 06 November 2008 - 12:08 AM

Once again, no. Both support ASCII password and 64-bit/128-bit key encryptions depending on the level of implementation.
And have you ever checked how keys are used in the 802.11i specs?
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#14 phpforfun

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Posted 06 November 2008 - 02:12 AM

Maybe you dont understand me...

The methods of cracking WEP is 100% different than cracking WPA/WPA2...

for WEP, the encryption bit does pretty much nothing, you can have 64, and it will require 5000 IV's, and will get cracked within 3 minutes, if its 128, it will require 10,000 IV's, and be cracked within 6 (maybe more depending on your signal strength).

WPA/WPA2 is cracked using a password list. The only reason this isnt too bad is becuase you can load the biggest password list known to man, and it wont deny you due to a certain number of failed attempts.

Argue all you want, I have cracked WEP 64bit and 128bit on my router, as well as wpa/wpa2 (of course I had to know the password and throw it in the password list, but it was like 100 passwords in)
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#15 Xav

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 08:48 AM

And why is X special to you?

Posted via CodeCall Mobile

X is an amazing letter - it has rotational symmetry order 4 if you draw it with four equal lines, it looks the same in lower and upper case (except with a size change), and symbolises many amazing things, like: X marks the spot, X-Ray, Xbox 360, XNA Framework for .NET, Xav.

Some people would say the same about you. ;)

... sugar titts.
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#16 phpforfun

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 11:15 AM

X is an amazing letter - it has rotational symmetry order 4 if you draw it with four equal lines, it looks the same in lower and upper case (except with a size change), and symbolises many amazing things, like: X marks the spot, X-Ray, Xbox 360, XNA Framework for .NET, Xav.

... sugar titts.


That does not make it a special character, That makes it a symmetrical character.
If being symmetrical and looking the same except for size change, is amazing, im rather curious what you think of the male reproductive utility, it has the same characteristics...
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#17 John

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 11:24 AM

Perhaps if you speak within the same context. While X might not be considered a "special character," it is a "character" and perhaps "special" to some. To me, Snoopy is a special character.
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#18 Xav

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 11:35 AM

That does not make it a special character, That makes it a symmetrical character.
If being symmetrical and looking the same except for size change, is amazing, im rather curious what you think of the male reproductive utility, it has the same characteristics...

Not looking quite the same.. and being the first letter of "Xav" makes it special.

Perhaps if you speak within the same context. While X might not be considered a "special character," it is a "character" and perhaps "special" to some. To me, Snoopy is a special character.

*groans*
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#19 phpforfun

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Posted 10 November 2008 - 07:05 PM

EDIT


As stated in my original post, you can spoof your mac to a mac that is connected, this obviously only works if you can see a mac that is connected to the BSSID.

STEP 7 (UPDATED)


Your authentication may fail, if it does, you will see this error:

20:04:12 Sending Authentication Request
Attack was unsuccessful. Possible reasons:

* Perhaps MAC address filtering is enabled.
* Check that the BSSID (-a option) is correct.
* Try to change the number of packets (-o option).
* The driver/card doesn't support injection.
* This attack sometimes fails against some APs.
* The card is not on the same channel as the AP.
* You're too far from the AP. Get closer, or lower
the transmit rate.

If its the MAC, try to spoof it, if you see someone connected to it, if not, youre out of loss.
Try to change your transfer rate

iwconfig rausb0 rate 1M

Obviously, switch rausb0 with your wireless card driver.

Chances are, if you change your mac and the transfer rate, and it still fails, then you arent able to connect. For me, its becasue im too far away from my BSSID at my house.

Edited by phpforfun, 11 November 2008 - 11:22 AM.

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#20 phpforfun

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 11:02 PM

Security: WPA Wi-Fi Security Gets Cracked; Your Network is No Longer Secure
Something to read up on :)
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#21 TkTech

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 01:36 AM

Thats old man. WPA is (echo in here?) just a modified form of WEP that removes known vulnerabilities like some open side channels. People have been able to break WPA networks for awhile.
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#22 phpforfun

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 08:09 PM

they are cracked 100% differently though.
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#23 Martin Cox

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Posted 02 December 2008 - 05:52 AM

Is there a similar project that can be done using PC tools to check the security of my home network?

You seem to be using a Linux tool that will change the MAC address - does this permanently change the MAC in your hardware device (wireless network card), or simply alter the packets from when you do the change until the next shutdown?


What are the drawbacks of shifting my home network to WPA-based?
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#24 TkTech

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Posted 02 December 2008 - 05:59 AM

Is there a similar project that can be done using PC tools to check the security of my home network?


These same tools can be found/compiled for the win32 platform. However, they usually only work with Atheros cards, because few drivers have been ported. Sniffing requires a special NIC mode where the card will listen to traffic not meant for it.

You seem to be using a Linux tool that will change the MAC address - does this permanently change the MAC in your hardware device (wireless network card), or simply alter the packets from when you do the change until the next shutdown?

You can mask your MAC temporarily (Ex, your router will do it automatically) by replacing the IP header. Some devices, however (it is device specific) support repsetting the MAC.

What are the drawbacks of shifting my home network to WPA-based?

Some crappy wireless devices may not be able to connect. Most common devices can, as well as all computers.
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